Press Release

Joe Cirincione to join Quincy Institute as Senior Non-Resident Fellow

September 1, 2020

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

CONTACT: Jessica Rosenblum, Quincy Institute, 202.279.0005/ [email protected]

WASHINGTON, DC — Joe Cirinicione, former president of Ploughshares Fund, will join the Quincy Institute for Responsible Statecraft in September as a Distinguished Non-Resident Fellow, the transpartisan think tank announced today.

In his capacity as a Distinguished Non-Resident Fellow, Cirincione will write regularly for QI’s publishing platform Responsible Statecraft, and will contribute to the scholarship. He will help represent QI in panels and in the media, and will bring his decades of experience to broadening and deepening  Quincy’s relationships within the foreign policy community.

“For decades Joe has been one of Washington’s most prominent voices against militarized foreign policy and nuclear proliferation,” said Lora Lumpe, CEO of the Quincy Institute. “His passion, his knowledge, and his record of facilitating real diplomatic accomplishments will be a great asset to the Quincy Institute, and we are incredibly excited and honored to have him join our team.”

During his 12 years as president of Ploughshares Fund, Cirincione quadrupled the organization’s budget, expanded its staff, and grew its influence in the fields of foreign policy and non-proliferation. Under his leadership, Ploughshares helped achieve the passage of the New START Treaty and the Iran nuclear agreement. Prior to this, he served as Senior Vice President for National Security and International Policy at the Center for American Progress, and as a senior associate and director for non-proliferation at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. He also worked for nine years on the House Armed Services Committee Staff. 

Cirincione is an expert on nuclear weapons and non-proliferation and has written multiple books on these subjects, including “Bomb Scare: the History and Future of Nuclear Weapons” (2007) and “Deadly Arsenals: Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical Threats” (2005). He currently teaches at the Georgetown School of Foreign Service.

“Since its launch last year, the Quincy Institute has stimulated a vital debate over the proper role of the United States in the world,” said Cirincione. “Joining Quincy is an ideal way for me to continue my work towards creating a more peaceful world, and I look forward to contributing to their efforts.”

The Quincy Institute’s non-resident fellows program connects experts in various facets of international relations, national security, and political science from around the United States and abroad with QI’s DC-based research and advocacy work. The non-resident fellows program broadens QI’s community of scholarship and strengthens its promotion of military restraint and peaceful diplomatic engagement. Quincy non-resident fellows contribute to the institute through writing, research, media appearances, and programming.

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